Tag Archives: Hundred Years War

Review of Chivalry at Edi’s Book Lighthouse

I always have a bit of trepidation when sending a piece of my work out into the world, so I’m very happy to report that the feedback to ‘Chivalry: A Jake Savage Adventure’ has been very positive. As well as good reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk and Smashwords, the story has also been picked up by a popular Book Blog Edi’s Book Lighthouse. Here’s some extracts from ediFanoB’s review:

Mark Lord gives a very intense and painstakingly depiction of the horrors of war. The setting is an unexpected one and the supernatural sparkle intensifies the atmosphere a lot.

The pacing is excellent and Mark Lord does not waste a word too much. The end is a tricky one. It is not an expected one and it delivers not the 100% solution. But it is as satisfying as the story itself.

I hope there will be more Jake Savage stories (a full novel would be great) soon.
Chivalry: A Jake Savage Adventure satisfied my craving for historical fiction with a mystery touch which is taking a greater part within my reading comfort zone of epic fantasy, steampunk and space opera.

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HISTORY Great Battles Medieval RPG Battle Game

This looks quite interesting, but shame there are no screenshots or videos. Wonder how it will compare to Medieval Total War? The screenshots of their previous game HISTORYTM Great Battles of Rome, look very Total War like.

Here’s some info:

HISTORYTM Great Battles Medieval is based on the historical events of the Hundred Years War, the most famous conflict of medieval times fought between France and England that shaped the future of both countries for centuries to follow. It features Slitherine’s cutting edge graphic engine and a brand new game play system that allows players to be in complete control of massive armies. From the thunderous charge of the knights to the men-at-arms fighting for their lives in hand-to-hand combat, the game will recreate the epic feel of medieval battles, featuring thousands of characters simultaneously.

  • Licensed and TV supported by HistoryTM, one of the best known brands for factual historical programming.
  • As the English you will fight under the Black Prince, Henry V and other heroic characters from history, and as the French you fight for Joan of Arc and the King.
  • 70 Medieval battles, including 26 historical encounters from the Hundred Years war, 1337-1453.
  • Command more than 20 different units all accurately researched and carefully modelled in amazing detail.
  • Customise your squads of archers, cavalry, knights, etc with over 100 unique fighting, combat and weapon skills.
  • Free form quest maps that allow players to decide when and where to fight within an historical framework.
  • Innovative Battle Card system that gives realistic bonuses and penalties in battle.
  • Multiplayer: join a game or host your own in 2 player head to head.
  • Extensive added historical documentary clips from the library of HISTORYTM TV channel.
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Press-ganged into the Lancastrian Affinity

Just a quick update on what I have been doing recently on my novel.

At the moment I am “just” doing research for my novel. This means I am reading a lot of books, making notes etc. The book I am reading at the moment is The Lancastrian Affinity 1361-1399 by Simon Walker. It describes in a lot of detail the retinue of John of Gaunt, son of Edward III and also Duke of Lancaster. After the death of the Black Prince, he was the most important noble in England, an important military commander and diplomat. Thus he also had the largest retinue in the land except for the King.

One thinks of English armies of the Hundred Years War as being professional volunteer armies hired for money, but the Duke still had the right to effectively press-gang soldiers via a commission of array, and he did this in Lancashire and Yorkshire to fill the ranks in campaigns such as the ill-fated expedition of 1373. The 300 archers raised were accompanied by men of Gaunt’s retinue on their way to the ships so that they didn’t try to escape. Some even paid money so they didn’t have to serve!

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French get it right against English Archers

I have just been scanning through a number of descriptions of Hundred Years War battles over at Wikipedia (so not necessarily 100% accurate), and as I expected it seems that in no cases were dismounted men-at-arms sent against archers. However, in later years the French did start to perfect the tactic of charging the English archers with heavy cavalry – for instance at the Battle of Patay decisively, and at the Battle of Vernuil with partial success. The key seems to have been heavy armour for the horses, sufficient numbers and disciplined charges.